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Video Commerce Summit Q&A

by Chris Dalton | 08.08.13

What was the most unexpected thing you saw at the summit?


Fritz: I was surprised by the level of quality of people there from companies. Everyone there was well represented. Big brands have people dedicated towards video and commerce.

Sam: I would say the number of representatives from large well known brands. That was surprising to me. It’s a smaller conference, but the folks that were there were a high density of industry leaders.

Nick: The amount of mobile app companies. Half the exhibitors were mobile app companies – it makes sense. One I saw was short mobile video created by users to give customer reviews of places.


How is e-commerce turning into video commerce?


Fritz: I think it’s the right combination of good content. I don’t think video commerce will take over e-commerce. I think video commerce is more of a mindset within e-commerce.

Sam: People are beginning to expect to see that kind of content online. Video is pretty much crucial at this point, because so many brands are doing it. I think just posting pictures and descriptions of products, isn’t sufficient anymore.

Nick: Video is a much more rich message than when you’re reading a description. And I think that’s where live video is especially important, because of the interactivity and feedback it allows.


Who are the major players in the video commerce industry, and what are they focusing on?


Fritz: Zappos is a big one. They used to focus on quantity, and do 500 videos a day. They scaled that back a bit, and rethought their strategy towards content. Now they are using more strategic storytelling in their videos.

Sam: I think Zappos is one of the leaders, and one of the things they’re focused on is keeping things simple – and not on the products they’re selling. The consumers who are buying their product – videos that are relevant to them. For example, a video on tying your shoes – it’s so basic, but usually everyone who sees it comes up with one way they’ve never seen before. They are taking it to a more personal level that doesn’t involve selling their product.

People just want to see something that’s gritty, not highly produced, they want to see their brands more human.


How are consumers reacting to these trends?


Fritz: A big debate in a lot of companies right now is, how much of the content should they create, and how much content should come from social? Suzie Reider, the keynote speaker from Youtube, spoke about Generation C – the generation that is curating content through social mediums.

Sam: People are beginning to expect to see that kind of content online. Video is pretty much crucial at this point, because so many brands are doing it. I think just posting pictures and descriptions of products, isn’t sufficient anymore.


What do you foresee as the main industry trends for the near future?


Sam: Social media folks are going to have a bigger role in the future. There will be more dedicated video people at these bigger brands and retailers. Who have a studio and budget, and shoot videos, and have an expected ROI.

I think you’re going to see social media folks and video folks working hand in hand to accomplish mutual goals.

Brands that even we wouldn’t think of as a fit for live video are interested in doing video. Non profits like the Humane Society.  Using it to increase social awareness, or have a live video channel for lost animals. There are a lot of applications we haven’t even thought of for our platform.

There’s really no limit to live video as long as you’ve got the connection and the camera to shoot it.




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